Monday, November 21, 2016

Tips On Tips

I didn't chose to split this video into parts, just added little notes as it rolled along. It's pretty useful information for those who do stained glass.


To watch it click here.

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5 Reasons You Should Do Or Own Stained Glass

This week or video subject was "5 Reasons You Should Do Or Own Stained Glass" and we took a trip to Downtown Provo Historic "Provo Town Square".
We pointed out the two sky lights that they ordered from us (to the left is one of the two). and we walked over to the "Here" store where we teach seminars once a month and we display many pieces that are for sale.
The five reasons you should have or own stained glass are pretty straight forward.

1. It's Inspiring. Stained Glass is an art, and a craft and a hobby, but most of all it’s a compelling hobby!


2. It's Beautiful. When we finished our first piece of stained glass, we kept calling each other into the living room. You’ve got to see this, it’s changed again!

3. It's Versatile. There are so many different uses for stained glass. We’ve built table tops and kaleidoscopes. We’ve created picture frames and Jewelry. The list of different projects goes on and on. We sell 11 videos on Amazon and 9 of them are instructions on how to build different types of projects.

4. It's Therapeutic. Some students have called it therapy. You never have time to get tired of the tasks, because once you start to tire, you’re on to the next step.

5. It's Valuable and Collectible. Stained glass has an intrinsic value. People recognize it as valuable. We sold a house and they offered us more if we agreed to leave the stained glass installed. Gifty sun catchers don’t last, but real windows become something that will be passed down to future generations.

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To View the video click here.

Saturday, November 12, 2016

5 Some Panels Are Happy!

5 Lessons From A Lecture was the subject this week. The video is a little hard to hear, you may want to turn on the caption feature. 

Fifth, Jeanne showed the "Rooster" panel and explained that they don't all have to have heavy symbolism inherent in the design, they can just be fun and whimsical.

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To see the video, click here.

4 The Bodi Tree Panel

5 Lessons From A Lecture was the subject this week. The video is a little hard to hear, you may want to turn on the caption feature. 

Fourth, Jeanne showed the "Bodi Tree" panel and explained the symbolism inherent in the design, including the roots of the tree and it's leaves.

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To see the video, click here.

3 The Gather Ring Mandala

5 Lessons From A Lecture was the subject this week. The video is a little hard to hear, you may want to turn on the caption feature. 

Third, Jeanne showed the "Gather Ring" panel and explained the symbolism inherent in the design.

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To see the video, click here.

Tuesday, November 08, 2016

2 Start With A Pattern

5 Lessons From A Lecture was the subject this week. The video is a little hard to hear, you may want to turn on the caption feature. 

Second David showed the bottom of the cube which showed the steps of building a stained glass panel. How we start with a pattern, trace the glass, foil and solder it.

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To see the video, click here.

1 Seasons Of Creativity

5 Lessons From A Lecture was the subject this week. The video is a little hard to hear, you may want to turn on the caption feature. 

First David showed a cube that we made to illustrate the "Seasons Of Creativity." First we Imagine, then we Create, Then we Share it and that Inspires someone else and the cycle continues, round and round.

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To see the video, click here.

Friday, October 28, 2016

5 Finish With Tail And Wheels

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.

Fifth, once wires are in place the tail can be attached and the wheels can be soldered underneath.

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Thursday, October 27, 2016

4 Solder The Upper Wing In Place

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.

Fourth, tack the upper wing in place and add wires to hold it in place.

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Wednesday, October 26, 2016

3 Solder On The Bottom Wings

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.

Third, we tack the bottom wings in place and then solder them in solidly.

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Tuesday, October 25, 2016

2 Use The PDF To Build Parts

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.

Second, use the PDF to cut out the parts for the bi-plane. Click here to get the PDF.

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1 Start With A Mini Scope Body

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.

First, we'll start with a mini scope body. This is the kaleidoscope built from the instructions above. You won't need the video if you've already built kaleidoscopes.

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Click Here To Go To Video

Kaleidoscope Becomes An Airplane

This week we revisit the instructions to creating an airplane kaleidoscope. Start with the kaleidoscope made from a mini-scope refill kit (instructions are available on our video sold on Amazon, click here for details) It's a pretty good project and the instructions can be helpful.


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Click Here To Go To Video

Thursday, October 20, 2016

5- Rock The Glass Apart!

Our New Five Steps video is about building a Jig. I felt that the clip I put up a few weeks ago touched on this but not in enough depth. 

The 5th step in Jig building is to rock the glass apart. (score it first) 

ALL DONE!


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4-Mark Where The Bevel Is Cut

Our New Five Steps video is about building a Jig. I felt that the clip I put up a few weeks ago touched on this but not in enough depth. 

The 4th step in Jig building is to mark where to cut the bevel. Place it on the pattern, use a marker to trace where the bevel should be cut and mark the glass.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

3-Use Strip Cutter to Determine Where Strips Go

Our New Five Steps video is about building a Jig. I felt that the clip I put up a few weeks ago touched on this but not in enough depth. 

The 3rd step in Jig building is to use the strip cutter to figure where the strips should go. Then mark them, cut them to length and place them on the jig. 

This is important, make sure they are placed so that the bevel sits exactly where you want it cut. If it gets turned around, you want it to fall in the same place.

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Monday, October 17, 2016

2- Cut 2 -1/8" Thick Wood Strips

Our New Five Steps video is about building a Jig. I felt that the clip I put up a few weeks ago touched on this but not in enough depth. The 2nd step in Jig building is to cut 2 -1/8" thick wood strips to be used as guides for setting glass in the jig.

About  1/2" wide will be good. Clip the corners off the strips so the head of the strip cutter can get closer to the edge of the glass.

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1-Start With A Board And A Wood Strip

Our New Five Steps video is about building a Jig. I felt that the clip I put up a few weeks ago touched on this but not in enough depth. The 1st step in Jig building is to Start with A Board And A Wood Strip.

A 12 X 12 piece of plywood and a 3/4" X 1-1/2" piece of pine usually work well for me. You nail the wood strip to the board to use as a cleat which will guide your strip cutter.

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Friday, October 07, 2016

You Tube Channel Is Growing

Today while doing some work on You Tube, I saw that we now have 1008 subscribers to our You Tube Channel. This seems a far cry from the  50 or so subscribers to this blog.

We currently have 68 videos on our YouTube channel. That will change shortly. We've been working with a firm to increase traffic to our website and they are just putting the finishing touches to 25 videos they've been working on for us. We expect them to be published some time next week. This should help us to get our love of stained glass message out to the world.

You know, we love all things stained glass and all things creative. As we approach the publication date of Jeanne's second Mandala book, we hope to meet more people and introduce them to the happiness and healing that can be found through stained glass.

Visit us at www.gsg-art.com, read the articles, view the creativity slideshow, and join our email list. We welcome your thoughts and insights as we share our love for the colorful art of stained glass.

Thursday, October 06, 2016

5 Replace New Piece into The Panel

This week We put up a video which is five steps to doing a simple straight forward stained glass repair. 

This fifth step is place the glass into the opening. We put a piece of scrap glass under so it sit's flush with the other glass. Then we solder in the piece, turn over the panel and solder the other side, after which we clean, patina and polish the repair which should look exactly like it did originally.

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4 Cut The Replacement Glass

This week We put up a video which is five steps to doing a simple straight forward stained glass repair. 

This fourth step is to cut, grind and fit the replacement glass. It doesn't have to be perfect. Remember that when building a panel you leave a little wiggle room, the same can be true with a repair.

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